2020 election

Jones Outpaces Tuberville 3-to-1 in Fundraising for Senate Campaign

U.S. Sen. Doug Jones and former Auburn coach Tommy Tuberville (Souces: Jones’ office, Tuberville’s campaign)

Sen. Doug Jones, generally regarded as the most vulnerable member of the U.S. Senate in the November elections, is approaching Election Day with huge advantages over Republican challenger Tommy Tuberville in fundraising and spending.

Reports filed Thursday with the Federal Elections Commission show the freshman Democrat raised about three times as much as Tuberville, a former Auburn University football coach, and spent almost five times as much during the three-month period that ended Sept. 30.

Jones narrowly defeated Roy Moore, the ousted Alabama chief justice, in a special election in December 2017. He has waged an aggressive campaign, stumping throughout the state and flooding the airwaves with ads, in his bid to win a full six-year term in the Senate.

In his quarterly FEC report, Jones listed net contributions of $9.91 million, while Tuberville showed collections of $3.32 million. Jones spent $10.76 million during the period, compared to $2.16 million for Tuberville.

For the entire campaign, Jones reported net contributions of $26.27 million; Tuberville’s net stood at $6.44 million.

Jones entered October with an account balance of $7.91 million; Tuberville had $1.73 million in cash.

Jones was unopposed for the Democratic nomination while Tuberville led a field of seven in the March 3 Republican primary, then beat former Sen. Jeff Sessions in a runoff July 14.

Sessions, who gave up the Senate seat when President Donald Trump appointed him as U.S. attorney general in early 2017, waged an aggressive campaign to reclaim the seat he held for almost two decades.

Sessions entered the GOP primary with $2.48 million left over from previous campaigns. His quarterly report on Thursday showed contributions of $149,249 and refunds of $176,156 for a net of minus $26,906 during the period. He spent a net of $468,358.

For the entire campaign, he listed net contributions of $2.08 million and net operating expenses of $5.08 million. The former attorney general showed an ending balance of $35,779.