Tag: Birmingham Board of Education

Board of Education President Criticizes Woodfin’s Plan to Cut Funding for Birmingham Schools

Though she insisted that she was “absolutely not here in my professional capacity,” Birmingham School Board President Daagye Hendricks addressed the Birmingham City Council on Tuesday, calling Mayor Randall Woodfin’s proposed FY 2021 budget “egregious” for cutting funding to city schools.

This year’s city budget is nearly $50 million smaller than last year’s budget, thanks to a sharp decline in the city’s business tax revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the $412 million budget’s many proposed austerity measures — which include funding cuts for external organizations and furloughs for hundreds of city employees — is a reduction of $1 million in city funding to Birmingham City Schools.
Read more.

Budget Blows to Birmingham Schools and Transit Being Cushioned, Other Groups are Not as Lucky

Mayor Randall Woodfin defended some controversial cuts in his proposed FY 2021 budget Tuesday, arguing that, despite a significant drop in city funding, both Birmingham City Schools and the Birmingham-Jefferson Transit Authority would continue to operate as usual. Much of the money they lost will be made up by funds from elsewhere.

Many other groups, including the library system, zoo and Railroad Park, are facing much bigger consequences. Read more.

Birmingham School Superintendent Receives 3.55 out of 5 in Evaluation

Birmingham’s school superintendent has “met expectations and goals for improvement” according to an evaluation presented at Tuesday’s board meeting.

On a 1 to 5 scale, Superintendent Lisa Herring received a 3.55 rating.

Two metrics were used in the evaluation: a rating based on benchmarks set out by the district’s strategic plan (3.36) and a cumulative score from board members (3.75). Those two scores were averaged to produce the final number. Read more.

Community Development Group Donates $50K to Washington K-8

Navigate Affordable Housing Partners, a housing and community development nonprofit organization, has donated $50,000 to Washington K-8 School as part of its work in the North Titusville neighborhood.

“Any development community effort is only successful it you have schools. Strong schools make for strong communities and strong communities have healthy families,” Lisa McCarroll, CEO of the group, said while presenting the donation during a Birmingham Board of Education board meeting June 11. Read more.

Making the Grade? How Birmingham City Schools Are Doing Depends on Which Measure You Choose.

Multiple choice:

1. The Birmingham City Schools system has a high number of failing schools as determined by the Alabama Accountability Act.
2. The Birmingham City Schools system is below average, based on a “D” grade on the Alabama Education Report Card for the 2016-2017 school year.
3. The Birmingham City Schools system is doing better, on the upswing.
4. All of the above.

If you chose “4” you may understand how complex it can be to determine the exact state of the city’s school system. Read more.

Read the rest of BirminghamWatch’s special report on Birmingham schools:

Many Questions About Birmingham City Schools Remain After Three Months of Trying to Understand the State of Education

The History of the Birmingham City Schools

Shooting for the A — Birmingham Schools principal succeeded at one school. Now he’s aiming to redirect another that is facing significant challenges

An Introduction to Birmingham Schools, From A to F

Birmingham Schools’ Superintendent Talks About Facing Competition for Students, Being Accountable and Building Relationships.

Many Questions About Birmingham City Schools Remain After Three Months of Trying to Understand the State of Education

Board

The Birmingham City Schools system is one of the largest in Alabama. At the same time, it has a difficult history and a present reality in which a number of schools are performing at standards lower than what the superintendent, board of education and city administration would like.
In an effort to understand the state of the schools, BirminghamWatch examined the data and sought interviews or written information from BCS officials. Our efforts were less than fully successful.
Read more.

The Numbers

The state report card assigns a letter grade to each school, each school system and the state itself. In the report card for the BCS, five schools have grades of “F,” meaning their average score is 59 or less on the assessments done by ALSDE. By that same criteria, 26 score “D” (60-69), 7 score “C” (70-79), 4 score “B” (80-89), and 1 scores “A” (90 and above).